Parenting TipsPregnancy

How to Sleep Better When You are Pregnant

When you’re pregnant, every mom will tell you to get sleep now before the baby comes. And that just adds more pressure to expectant mothers who are already having trouble sleeping. There are a few things about pregnancy that don’t mix well with sleep, and so it’s completely normal for you to be struggling with this right now. Pregnancy can affect your sleep in ways you wouldn’t imagine. So, in this post, we’re going to cover how expectant mothers can get a better night’s sleep.

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1. Hydrate Early

You already understand the importance of good hydration during pregnancy, but on a deeper level, you understand the irritation of frequent potty breaks during the night.

To combat this, finish hydrating for the day about two hours before bedtime. If you feel parched, take a sip or two but not more. This is just one thing that could be disturbing your sleep, but it’s one that you can have some control over.

 

2. Exercise

It’s definitely a challenge to exercise as you get deeper into your pregnancy, but it also becomes more crucial. When you exercise, you’re improving circulation, which is crucial during this time. The increase in circulation can help you avoid cramps and those “numb limbs” that pregnant women tend to get. This is a result of poor circulation as the body adjusts to send more blood flow and nutrients to the developing baby.

 

3. Avoid Spicy and Fried Foods

This one can be difficult when you’re having cravings, but it’s best to avoid spicy, fried, or acidic foods because they can aggravate or cause heartburn. Even if you’ve never had trouble with heartburn, you’re going to be more prone to this issue during pregnancy – and it can be bad enough to keep you up at night.

 

4. Meditate an Hour Before Bed

When you’re pregnant, it’s almost as if everything amplifies – especially worry. So it can be difficult to settle down for a good night’s rest. Meditating an hour before bed can help calm your mind and put you in a more relaxed state, so you’ll find it easier to get some shuteye. You’ll just want to separate your meditation time from bedtime because you don’t want to fall asleep while meditating. There are many benefits to meditating, and you won’t get them if you snooze.

 

5. Stack your Pillows

Sleep during pregnancy is especially rough for moms who are used to sleeping on their back or (worse) stomachs. Neither of these positions is recommended for expectant moms. Actually, doctors recommend that you sleep on your left side after 20 weeks of pregnancy. This is the optimal position for blood flow to the baby, your uterus, and kidneys. Try putting one pillow between your knees an another under your belly to support your position. If you’re worried about rolling onto your back, you can stack some extra pillows behind you.


 

6. Create a Bedtime Routine

When the baby comes, you’ll need to get a bedtime routine down. But if you’re having trouble sleeping, now is a great time to start. Try unwinding at least an hour before bed. You can start with meditation and then sit quietly with a warm cup of herbal (pregnancy safe) tea. Just be sure to turn off the electronic devices when the wind-down routine begins because the blue lights that those devices emit can keep your mind overstimulated.

Consider what you’re up against; it seems terribly unfair for expectant moms to have trouble sleeping. Because as all that well-meaning advice implies, you’re about to enter a period of restless sleep for anywhere between 6 months and 18 years.

Do what you can to control your sleep now.

 

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TWL Working Mom

Jennifer is the Owner of TWL Working Moms and Co-Owner of Influential Mamas.  Along with blogging + freelance writing, she is a mom, army wife and full-time teacher. Jennifer lives in Washington State and is a born + raised New Yorker. In her spare time, she loves traveling, yoga, the beach, writing, listening to books and drinking coffee.

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